https://lesliet.typepad.com > Aquarium, November 2005

01 - Redbelly turtles

01 - Redbelly turtles

These are little Plymouth Redbelly turtles, which is an endangered species from Cape Cod.


02 - Redbelly closeup

02 - Redbelly closeup

You can see how they got their name.


03 - Looking in

03 - Looking in

Here's our group, and guide John, looking into one of the cold-water exhibition tanks.


04 - View of the anemone tank

04 - View of the anemone tank

Here's what we were looking at.


05 - Sea anemones

05 - Sea anemones

A closeup view of the sea anemones. Later you'll see what this tank looks like from the front.


06 - Eel

06 - Eel

The giant eel seemed very interested in us and kept coming up for a look.


07 - Behind the scenes

07 - Behind the scenes

A view of the backstage area. The public viewing tanks are on the right, and smaller holding tanks are on the left. The floor here is about 5 steps higher than the floor outside to allow easier access to the tanks.


08 - Blue lobster

08 - Blue lobster

From time to time, fishermen donate oddities that they run across to the aquarium. This blue lobster was an amazing shade of blue - partly because he had recently molted and his shell was in pristine condition.


09 - White lobster

09 - White lobster

The white lobster has more algae on its shell, so isn't the brilliant white it was when the shell was new.


10 - Anemone tank from the front

10 - Anemone tank from the front

Here's what the anemone tank looks like from the museum floor.


11 - Cleaning the tank

11 - Cleaning the tank

Tank maintenance is a daily task. This diver is working in the huge central tank.


12 - Sea turtle

12 - Sea turtle

This sea turtle is huge, and is thought to be about 75 years old.


13 - Sea turtle

13 - Sea turtle

It's amazing to see something this large gliding gracefully by.


14 - Penguins

14 - Penguins

The aquarium has a large collection of various types of penguins - I think about 70 in all. They have a very nice rockery at the base of the big tank.


15 -What are these guys up to

15 -What are these guys up to

While watching the penguins, these two caught our eye. They appeared to be having a tender moment.


16 - A tender moment

16 - A tender moment

I tried to get a closeup - sorry it's so fuzzy.


17 - Molting penguin

17 - Molting penguin

Penguins are birds and are covered with lots of tiny feathers that form an insulating layer to allow them to swim in the very cold ocean. Periodically, they molt, which means that new feathers come in and push out the old ones. This process takes about 3 weeks. While molting (in the wild at least) they cannot swim or eat, which puts them in a bad temper. They also look pretty funny.


18 - Penguin altercation

18 - Penguin altercation

The molting penguin (top right) got into a fight with another guy who got too close to his patch of rock (bottom right). They pecked at each other and made some fascinating screechy cries before the bottom guy backed off.